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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 156 (some duplicates have been removed)
. there are places where we don't have market mechanisms. in health care and education, as we've gotten rich, those are bigger parts of the economy and our ability to use normal, private sector things to work in those areas is very, very weak. 95% of teachers are never given any feedback. never told, hey, you do this well, but you should work on this. go over and see how some other teacher calms the classroom down or makes a complex subject interesting. and i think if we bring feedback systems, which means measuring and telling people how they're doing, we bring that into areas like teaching, we can get more out of the education investments that we make. >> but you think that because of technology and that kind of thing, americans today have many more opportunities in some sense than they had before? >> that's right. if you take median income and that means we haven't had this big improvement. >> which hasn't changed in the last 25 years. >> that really understates what's happened. i mean, would you rather be a gay man 20 years ago, 50 years ago? in africa and gdp didn't go up, but life spans almos
three, and critically important as education and guidance. more than ever workers are responsible for saving and planning for their retirement. they need help understanding a range of financial topics from the most basic information about how to enroll and how much they should save to the more complex topics such as proper asset allocation and in come planning. workers had received guidance take action and have better outcomes. our data shows that workers who engage in a retirement planning session as and nexium pulled either online or on the phone increase their deferral rates on average by five to six percentage points. one thing that is constant in all of our research is that a majority of workers want and need help. workers also need a simple way to gauge their savings process. last fall fidelity released new research on age based savings guidelines. these guidelines serve as a framework for establishing the retirement savings goals as workers progress through their careers, their salary, time a factor of x can be one of the measures used to assess the retirement savings progr
them to be harvard educated, and glue them on top of what is becoming increasingly a very violent and islamist uprising. there are over 1000 militias fighting in syria. the syrian opposition today, which america helped put together, are a bunch of harvard educated liberal people that we would like to will syria in the future. because we hope that we can glue them on top of this islamic militia and quiet them down. we said exactly the same thing about iraq. what do we have? we have a shiite a picture ship. they were not secular. they were religious. the neocons got everything wrong on what would happen to iraq. it will get it wrong on what will happen in syria. mockers he is not happening in syria anytime soon. the only two social indicators that have any reliable connection to whether democratic experiments work, are median age and per capita income. those -- our median age is 30 and above, you stick to democracy 30% of the time. per capita income, about $10,000 per person. syria, the median age is 20 one years old. iraq it was 21. syria has a per capita gdp of about $1000. we are
education activist michelle rhee in our sunday spotlight. to the best vacation spot on earth. (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing or just lay in the sun. we've got coastline to explore and wildlife to photograph. and there's world class dining with our world famous seafood. so for a great vacation this year, come to the gulf. its all fabulous but i give florida the edge. right after mississippi. you mean alabama. say louisiana or there's no dessert. this invitation is brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. >>> lots more roundtable coming up but first the "sunday funnies." >> last we
trained people in the war zone and educational where, that you lack the capability to have well-trained individuals that you can deploy elsewhere. and that creates a real readiness crisis for us. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you. >> thank you very much, senator. senator bloomen that is next. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to join my colleagues in thanking you, secretary panetta for your extraordinary service to our nation, and the personal sober and time that you are have devoted to all of us on the panel and other members of the congress. general dempsey, thank you as well for your service. and to both of you for your forthright and credible and significant testimony today explaining some answers to questions that are painful, i think, for all of us, and i know for you having attended the services and ceremonies in honor of these brave patriots and heroes, as you call them, and also your knowledge personally of them. and i'm struck as senator senator kaine was by the provocative i would prefer to call it powerful statement you offered regarding the effect on the nati
in things like education and research and development that are going to help us grow. >> pelley: without raising rates again? >> without raising rates again. >> pelley: the president also made news with his opinion on the boy scouts. the national board of the boy scouts of america may decide this week whether to end its long-standing ban on gays in scouting. should scouting be open to gays? >> yes. >> pelley: why so? >> well because i think that my attitude is that gays and lesbians should have access and opportunity the same way everybody else does. in every institution and walk of life. and, you know, the scouts are a great institution that are promoting young people and exposing them to opportunities and leadership that will serve people for the rest of their lives. i think nobody should be barred for that. >> pelley: the scouts decide by wednesday. one of the oldest missing persons cases in history has been solved. how did a murderer with a history of mental illness get permits to buy guns? and the girl who was shot for defying the taliban speaks out when the "cbs evening news" conti
month-- she insisted she will go on advocating for the education of girls. >> i'm getting better day by day. it's just because of people. because all the people, men, women, children, all of them, all of them have prayed for me. because of these prayers, god has given me a second life. this is a new life. i want to serve the people. i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> sreenivasan: the teenager is expected to remain in britain for some time. newly installed secretary of state john kerry had his first day on the job today. the former senator entered the state department's harry truman building to a big crowd and loud cheers from staffers. he said he hopes to help make the world more prosperous and peaceful. wall street had its worst day of the year to date, amid new concerns about europe and its debt load. the dow jones industrial average fell back under 14,000 losing 129 points to close at 13,880. the nasdaq dropped nearly 48 points to close at 3131. baltimore ravens fans celebrated their super bowl win today. it was the second time the team has won the nfl championship.
of the healthcare spending. that is an important point. >> let's switch to another passionate topic. education. quite a few questions from the audience on how much can we afford to fund and where should we be funding and investing in the educational system? should it be done on a national level or a state level? >> let's mix it up, you go first. >> i have read that test scores of american elementary and secondary educational students have not increased and the famous nation at risk report in the early 1980's. even though spending has increased dramatically. i question whether the solution to the problem is, let's take those systems and pour money into it are. it's hard to argue against earning more money, that and possibly hurt. but you basically have major structural flaws in the way the system is organized. it is not producing the results that we need. i strongly believe that -- i would say, after entitlement spending, i would put the quality of our educational outcomes as the greatest long-term threat to america's economic strength. it is the most important thing, and it has to do with stru
you live could determine your education, right? but there is a campaign to try to change that. former wnba star lisa leslie is leading the way. why she's shifting her way from basketball, her focus here on to education. [ female announcer ] today, jason is here to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jason chose aleve. just two pills for all day pain relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long sinus and headache relief. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?!
were all going to act, no matter how we were involved in the project of educating our kids -- we were going to put our kids first. that sounds like obstruction, but when you are in the hard work of having to close schools, it gives you an ability to remind people of what the interest of kids.ch is acting in whether it is our compact or whether it is here, particularly here, because of the detailed nature, it does give us a road map. and i think it holds together. employer verification, a path to citizenship, making sure we are not rejecting talented people from other countries that have a ph.d. is and a real contribution to make here, and so on all of these things, in a substantive way, hang together. but the politically hang together. over years of debates on immigration reform, it has been clear what the component pieces are that are necessary for a large deal. i can filibuster all day long, but i do think colorado, in some sense, it is unusual, maybe. we seem to -- the ski resorts of mentioned earlier -- a huge number of moving pieces. >> part of politics is put yourselves in the s
for public education as to how you should be doing these things. if you join the nra and go to one of the 80,000 trainers you get that. there are a lot of people that aren't nra members. the public education campaign on the safety of firearms would be great. we would love to support it. >> first of all, i would like to get the signup sheet for the field trip for the gun show. [laughter] >> i'll tell you what, the next time they have the gun show, i'll have a signup sheet. if anybody wants to go i'll take them. i can't get you in for free. >> sometimes so you a little bit of an expense. [laughter] >> there's been a lot of talk about whether this is different. and it's a political question not an ideological question. do you think this time is different? and if it is, it doesn't seem that the nra has changed in any way the positions on what is acceptable or not acceptable to reflect that. i have another question. i'll let you answer that one. >> sure. i think that our opponents hope this is different in the sense they hope they can use a motion to achieve an antifirearm agenda they haven't bee
to me. she was great. she is articulate, very well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos. but the press would not give her the same accolades, the general media would not give for this and accolades, not because she was competent, but because of her political ideology. there is some dispute bi -- skewed bias rating hillary clinton for some of the wrong things. host: on twitter -- "the washington post" adds this as far as analysis of her time in office -- "many of clinton's successes appeared to be due largely to her personal popularity and famous work ethics, attributes that were on display in her final days in office." nevada. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. i think the only reason she ever had her job was because of her husband, bill. she did exactly what she has been told to do by the president's, and a lot of us are not on tune with president obama's schedule, especially this benghazi deal. whenever a person throws her hands up in the air and is not want to admit to any responsibility of a job done po
the price for a beautiful quilt, peace in san francisco with jobs, with quality education and jobs and surl celebration and bring to you jesse jackson who will speak to you and how we pay the price for peace in this city. [applause] >> amos, are you presenting me with the quilt? i want my quilt. i want my quilt. i am delighted to be here with you today. so many years ago i met -- dr. king and i went to minnesota and reverend amos was then pastoring in minnesota before the snow chased him to san francisco and knew dr. king and his father and had a class in moore house of seven students. dr. brown and members of the class and knew them before and before then and he brings a lean yaj of struggle to the table every time he speaks with tremendous morale authority and stroke couldn't stop him for fight wg great power. [applause] i want to thank mayor ed lee for convening the family. for all the times we think of leading from the front. often you lead from the center. you have the power to convene the family, to look at a family crisis and think it through, and it figure it out, and if we
system or education. it will be more protests against the way politics are run in spain. it is a new situation. it has never happened before. it could really lead to changes or not. there is no precedent. >> a schoolgirl and pakistan is being treated after being shot by the taliban and has undergone another to successful operations. she was shot in the head in october as she left school. she was targeted because she campaigned for girls' education. on saturday, doctors reconstructed her skull and fitted in plant into her ear. doctors say they are pleased with her progress. there currently at the country residence of the bridge by mr. following talks on monday trade is the third trilateral summit since last year. the leaders met in july and into the timber. but for the first time, terry and intelligence officials will join them for face-to-face talks as part of an effort to improve cooperation and forestry to withdraw from afghanistan next year. a fire has destroyed almost 100 homes in a shantytown in the capital of bangladesh. everyone appears to have escaped, but it has left more th
's behavior by members of the military and a savings plan and he finds financial education program substantially increased savings in the tsp have had no or sunpak, for example, on the amount of credit for military members have outstanding. so re-signing of crowd out there. the society by my colleague at harvard looking at denmark are much better data and they are so concerned about privacy. when they look at automatic savings programs, they found little cutout and other parts of the balance sheet either. so i think it's a legitimate concern, though most of the evidence suggests certainly it's not one-for-one offset. >> any other thoughts on the crowd out at all ms. mccarthy? >> i would offer we don't have it. the complexity it would affect the asset the pain is difficult. it's important on the automatic enrollment is a significant impact in getting participants into the plan. our enrollment rate, participation rate is 67% previous automatic enrollment 80%. it's a very powerful distinction in and of itself is so dramatic that it's hard for me to think is creating a big distraction
and strong supporter of catholic education, i once again this year introduced a resolution honoring catholic schools. h.res. 46 expresses support for the vital contributions of the thousands of calt lick elementary and secondary schools -- catholic elementary and secondary schools in the united states and the key role they play in promoting and ensuring a brighter, stronger future for our nation. i'd like to thank the 28 members who co-sponsored this bipartisan resolution with me. since 1974 the national catholic education association, the united states conference of catholic bishops have organized and planned national catholic schools week. this year's theme, catholic schools raise the standards highlights recent initiatives undertaken by catholic schools across the country to strengthen the already exemplary standards. america's catholic schools produce graduates with the schools and integrity needed by our businesses, governments, and communities emphasizing a well-rounded educational experience in instilling the values of giving back to community and helping others. nearly every catholic
enough, it's education education education. >> he had a mental breakdown and crashed a car. i will admit i did crack up watching that stuff because i'm a sick, sick man. >> because it was so stupid. >> because it was so stupid, but you're right he's setting himself up. >> this could force someone who thinks they adore rampage to think awesome let's try that. >> he also miss spelled girl, which upset me.
, it is the lack of awareness and education that they told us. they never explained to us or even let us know what a concussion was. i had no idea until recently. even since i retired in 2008 from the patriots, i would still experience headaches. i would experience headaches from sunday until tuesday and wednesday. even at times, there's a sense of loneliness, anxiety problems, and sometimes i just get headaches from just being in bright lights. it is tough. people have to understand these players, a lot of their agenda is based on money, but a lot of these players are really suffering read this is for real. i am experiencing now. i am scared to death. i have children and a beautiful wife. i'm scared what will happen to me 10, 15 years from now. >> law concussion were once an unspoken and misunderstood problem, today more than 4000 former nfl players have filed a lawsuit against the league. they contend the nfl, which makes $9.5 billion a year, new hits to the head could lead to long-term brain damage but chose not disclose that information. new rules are being instituted to minimize future injuri
successive generation of americans more choices, more options, more education, more opportunities. i think we are faced with the prospect today of the generation of my wife and my two teenage children having the real prospect of having a life not with as many opportunities. in fact, a lower standard of living. that has ever been in the united states. i don't want predict that, i don't project that. i think we're dangerously close to that. and so i cover a lot of different areas in the book. i have 15 chapters, i talk about, as stuart noted, energy, the environment, education, politics. i have two chapters on iraq. i don't think i could write a book about where i think we are in the world today without reflecting to some extempt on iraq because -- to some extented on iraq because it has been the center of gravity in this country for five years. regardless where you come down on iraq, right, left, somewhere in the middle is not the point. i couldn't write a book without talking about iraq. i have a chapter on the middle east, i have a chapter on afghanistan and on china, i talk about russia. in
an education. on saturday, she walked to the operating room. for five more hours of surgery. doctors implanted a titanium plate and a sophisticated hearing aid, repairing where the bullet smashed her skull and left her deaf in one ear. 24 hours later, malala was talking again. >> i can also walk a little bit. i can talk. and i'm feeling better. and it doesn't seem that i had a very big operation. >> reporter: other patients might have complained. malala stayed focused. >> the thing is that my mission is the same, to help people. and i would do that. >> reporter: the medical team has grown close to malala. >> i'm inspired from the doctors and nurses. they are like my mother and father. >> reporter: malala will stay here in britain for at least another year. they're finding a place for a local school for a young woman whose passion is education for all. >> this is the second life, this is the new life. and i want to serve the people. >> reporter: she is recovering, and more determined than ever. keir simmons, nbc news, birmingham, england. >>> and when we come back, one of the world's great endu
of our endeavors and the second one, we are focused on educating physicians in a way that will allow them to participate in this future that is more team based and quite different than the medicine of the past. if there, thinking of the physician sustainability and practice so that physicians can do what they love to do and that is take care of the patient. let me say as a recovering dean and hospital system ceo and now ceo of the ama i have learned to always try to jump in and of adjudicator early conflicts before the blood. so, with grace, len, tom and alladi in our view there is more to become nothing more eloquent than the high road and care. thank you. [applause] >> some news out of washington energy secretary of state chu announced he will resign once his successor is confirmed in a memo to colleagues received by politico. the former prisoners of he's eager to return to california and academic life. the white house released a statement by the press in which he said steve brought to the energy department a unique understanding of both the urgent challenge presented by climate change
are struggling during this financial crisis. we get calls related to those. we are trying to educate homeowners about that so they did not become victims in the first place. but a lot of people will lose their homes of the situation. host: christy romero, special inspector general for tarp. the question about the teeth -- question of to this executive pay, if treasury signed off on it, what can sigtarp really do? guest: we make recommendations to treasury and a half to be dealt with. we also report to congress. we send these reports to congress and congress helps put teeth in it. but a ultimately we have a lot of recommendations that are not implemented and they need to be. this is an example that shows how bad it can be a treasury does not implement the recommendation. i am looking forward to a new secretary of treasury coming in to talk about those recommendations and changes that can be made. and we will not give up. we will look at 2013 pay. we will not stop. because alternately we are here to protect taxpayers. host: amelia, ohio. democrats' line. caller: how are you? my question is about
educated for the 21st century economy. that means making investments in education. it means trying to address the situation where even as we have for 35 straight months in private sector job creation, we have for much of that time seen job loss in state and local governments. that is a portion of it. in education, schoolteachers, the president has put forward proposals. this is his highest priority. it is important to look at things like immigration reform. businesses have vocally and publicly, as an economic necessity -- the economic benefits of comprehensive immigration reform are manyfold and very important. that is the principal reason the president believes we need to come forward in a bipartisan way and get this done. there is every reason, both economic and otherwise, he to continue to make the progress that has been made, that we have seen. and get it done. get a bill passed that represents the consensus that is building who, he that reflects the principles that are shared by the bipartisan group in the senate, and make it law, make it a fact. >> are there any changes in th
to live without. embarrassment's and education and infrastructure. research and development -- investments and education and infrastructure. already republicans and democrats of work together to reduce deficits by $2.50 trillion. that is a good start. to get the rest of the way, we need a balanced set of reforms. for example, we need to lower the cost of health care and programs like medicare that are the biggest drivers of the deficit. these reforms must go hand in hand with eliminating excess spending in the tax code so the wealthiest individuals can ticket veg of loopholes and deductions the kind of bailable to most americans. it can be a year solid growth, more jobs, and higher wages. that will only happen of reporters up to self-inflicted wounds. host: the president in his weekly address. the earlier debt limit with $16.40 trillion. we have surpassed that. you can keep track of it at usdebtclock.org. it is now $60.50 trillion. the next debate over the debt limit is likely to come up mid may. a story from "the weekly standard." we need a better argument against the debt. she writes --
to reach out to the industry to come up with a way to really promote financial literacy and education before college level, getting into high schools so that we have an educated group of young folks who come out and understand about the importance of having a financial house in order, the importance of having a good credit history, the understanding what it means to be smart about using credit. >> you can watch that entire conversation with the chamber of commerce this afternoon right after the farewell ceremony for secretary of defense leon panetta, which is expected to start at about 3:45 p.m. eastern, and next tuesday night, president obama delivering his fourth state of the union address to a joint session of congress. it includes the president's speech at 9:00 and the republican response from florida senator marco rubio. that will be on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org >> first lady helen taft on discussing politics. >> i always had the satisfaction of knowing almost as much as he about the politics and intricacies of any situation. i think any woman can discuss with her husb
-the-board cuts to education, to research and development, would have repeat, would have, damaging effects on our economy and our long-term economic prospects. unquote. a growing number of analysts believe the political will to stop the sequester is lacking. it will take effect, at least temporarily, they believe, and that will pose a further the f of this year. question. the fed is saying that the fourth quarter contraction october, november, december of 2012 was due chiefly to quote unquote transitory factors. is this true? or is the recovery stalling out pat buchanan? >> i think basically it is true, john. the u.s. economy is out of the intensive care it was in, in 2007-2008 but it has been walking the hospital halls ever since. the growth has been growing at an average of about 2%, unemployment is where it was when barack obama took office, we are adding about 150,000 jobs a month, but john, the real problem here is this slow growing is occurring when we have had five straight trillion dollars worth of defense deficits to pump it up and we get $85 billion a month in transfusions a month from
educated. >> but the gi bill is a liberal policy. >> but no, listen to what i'm saying underneath it. i'm talking about the commitment to national defense and understanding of the role of the military and the united states, the relationship between the military national readiness, how we project otherwise in the world. >> but that's the patriotic americans in the united states are african-american? >> sure. but -- >> is there -- >> liberals. those things are -- >> no. but i think when you go underneath, there is a deep well of social conservativism among african-americans. >> i agree 100% with that. but i don't want to see the republican party become a pandering party, either. >> no. that's not what i've said. >> i know that's not what you've said. but our message used to be one of growth, opportunity for everyone. and i think that that still is the message, we just don't get it out in an appropriate way. >> and that's a very good point. >> beyond that, the policy that support that are what's really important and i'd like to see us get back to -- >> can i say quickly, there's been this
that a challenge and transform the fields of biotechnology, genomics, personalized medicine and science education. [applause] >> barry c. mazur. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of science to barry c. mazur, harvard university, the original and landmark contributions to differential policy, number theory, algebraic geometry where him and other applications his work was fundamental to wild proof of fairmont theorem and for his dedication to communicating subtle mathematical ideas to the broader public. [applause] >> lucy shapiro. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of science to lucy shapiro, stanford university, for the pioneering discoveries in bacterial cell controlled by an integrated genetic circuit functioning in time and space that serves as a systems engineering paradigm underlying cell differentiation and ultimately the generation of diversity in all organisms. [applause] >> anne m. treisman. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of science to anne m. treisman, princeton university, for a 50 year career of penetrating originality and depth that has led to the understanding of fundamental limit
spending, we cannot just cut our way to prosperity. deep indiscriminate cuts to education and training, energy, and national security will cost us jobs and it will slow down our recovery. it's not the right thing to do it for the economy. it's not the right thing for folks out there still looking for work. host: your reaction? guest: the president was serious about not slowing down the economy, he would get a handle on his environmental protection agency and stop some of the regulations. he would approved the keystone pipeline. that is something that has been sitting on his desk a long time. there are things that could be done to help the economy apart from the sequestered. the reason the sequester is tough is when you pick up the federal budget and say we will try to find savings in the budget, every single line has a constituency and a lobbyist somewhere, whether it is a municipal organization, whether it is a big defense contractor, everyone has something that interests them. that's why it's difficult to say we are one to take out this line of that line when there is a loser in that
was great. she was articulate, well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos, but the press would not give her the same accolade. the general media would not give her the same accolade, not because she was not constant, but because of her political ideology. i think there is some bias in reading hillary clinton -- rating hillary clinton. >> that was lawrence from -- host: that was lawrence from st. paul. "the washington post has this as far as analysis -- nebraska, on the republican line. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. think the only reason that she ever had her job was because of her husband built. she has done exactly what she has been told to do by the president, and a lot of us are not in tune with president obama's schedule. especially when we have at least lousy deals, whenever a person throws her hand up in the air and does not want to admit to any responsibility of the job done poorly that killed some of our american -- not happy with her performance ticket she is just mirror of -- performance. she is j
well-respected and educated scientists who had fled nazi and fascist europe and they were recruited. they were met at the station and driven into town, and they would have checked in at this store, which was supposed to look like just a regular tourist store in santa fe. it was operate bid a woman named dorothy mckin nonwho oppenheimer recite, and she processed their paper work and gave them instructions, and los alamos was guarded with a secure perimeter and they wouldn't be coming back to accept the that often but if they did come they were to use not their own names, make up a name, and not mention their name at all because they all spoke with thick european accent. so they managed to build the bomb and helped end the war earlier. but they definitely had an impact on santa fe. there were rumors about spies, and secrets being traded to the russians, and we know now that was done here in santa fe. another book that is very close to my heart, i want to toll you -- tell you about, it's an older book but it is nonfiction. the house at the bridge written by peggy church. it is a more i
lived, when you think about the american dream, better education, student debt is an all time high. we have seen the housing bubble burst and better job and unemployment is so high. for adults to be less optimistic than their children may make sense. >> my parents lived through the great depression and all reminded me of that and the difficult times. it made a difference in my life. take a look at this. the next gallup poll, will your kids be better off than you, they are more cautious? >> they just lived through one of the worst recessions we've ever had and we are in the worst of the recoveries we've ever had. in most recent memory they are facing unemployment and wealth is down the stock market is up so there are reasons for optimism but adults in recent memory have so many things that have been going bad, it's tough to be optimistic. >> gregg: throw the next one up. i think it is interesting. it breaks down among gender. look at this. actually better life, homes, better education, girls are more optimistic than boys? >> that is very interesting. we have seen women and girls make tr
about education in the foreign policy debate. >> when you were there in the middle of the first debate, the one that the president was said to have them poor, as this was happening, was that your impression? >> no. >> what was your impression? >> the impressions that are going on, i considered more than one thing at a time, and i believed that romney was doing better and i thought that he was doing well. my own rule is that mitt romney is talking, and obama is standing here, i only look at mitt romney and i never look at the other candidate. i don't want to be a party to his reaction. the consequence is that when mitt romney was talking i did not know, even though i was closer to him than anybody, i was not watching the reactions of barack obama. the only time i looked at him as when he was talking. i cannot help but notice a couple of times he did not look at me, i did not have the impression. >> in the vice-presidential debate, did you see or hear anything that we, as television viewers of the debate may have missed? >> it is one thing from jim's book, you may miss the moment, on tel
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 156 (some duplicates have been removed)